See how it works Google Scholar, Google's new search

At the end of last week Google put online the beta version Google Scholar, Its new search engine to locate technical information among all articles, studies, theses, white papers, case studies, Technical reports, research, documentation research centers and universities, books, etc ... published.

It has not even been a month since Google launched its Google Desktop Search tool that has pleasantly surprised us again throwing Google Scholar.

The initial image is very similar to Web search engine Google, however, we have introduced a search topic and give the button "search"We ordered a results window with no commercial information without ads appear. Sorting criteria take into account the content of the documents, the author, the publication in which the document appears, in a similar way as it does for the Web version with links-inThe number of citations to that article in other documents. Finally, it draws attention to the links shown are not unique, as the same article may be published in different media. Even it has links to documents referenced by studies (even they can not exist on the Web), similar to the concept links-out Web version.

To limit searches by author, allows us to include in the filter box seeker "author:" we can write alone or with the theme or concept we are looking to limit the number of results to be obtained.

Turning to practice, I have dedicated myself to making a few searches in the two versions of Google to see the real differences. The first search I've done is "eye tracking technology". The Web version has given me references and four ads 1,040,000. The first 10 results, 4 are companies that sell such technology-related solutions. The remaining 6 are studies or related technical information. In contrast, the results shown by 13,600 Google Scholar 100% are technical, not commercial references or advertisements appearing ... so perfect!

I have taken a second example, "web metrics". The results have been curiously very similar. Of seven advertisements and 2,050,000 results for the Web version, 40% were technical results and 60% commercial results. For version Google ScholarThey have been 28,000 the results, all technical again.

Finally, mention the authors whose technical documents have not yet been indexed they should ask their school, college or publisher to contact Google Scholar to include such content. Google Scholar moment does not allow direct publication by the author of reports and documents. More information is available in the FAQ.

Definitely a tool that will be talking in the research community from now.

Invent a robot that hunts flies for energy and self-sufficient

Although it seems a joke, it is not. The New Scientist magazine has published in its Monday edition, this great invention. A robot that uses the sugar in the exoskeleton of the flies and allows (while flies from view) the robot does not need another power source.

If we read well the article we see that the thing is not as simple as it seems at first glance. Input power the robot obtained by breaking polysaccharide chains of the exoskeleton of the flies is very low and only allows the robot to move 2 centimeters every 12 minutes.

On the other hand, there is the problem of making the flies come ... but that have worked out well. The robot uses a flavor, synthesized from human feces, which attracts flies into a funnel that sucks up the digestive tract. Hahahaha ... you can not deny that is well thought out.

Robotic Anecdotes aside, the investigations that led to the invention of this robot open up endless possibilities:

  • The energy of the polysaccharides can be used to supplement the solar energy to manufacture any kind of "thing" that needs to be energetically autonomous. (How about a robot that when not shine, eat potatoes, beets, ... or GM soy?).
  • Production of electricity for households may attempt be made from the feces and organic waste, home users own: which would reduce the amount of waste that cities need to collect, process and eliminate. The most abundant polysaccharide in nature are starch and cellulose ... our wastes are filled with them. 50 gr. sugar can remain alight 40w bulb for 8 hours.
  • The use of sugar batteries to replace batteries in mobile phones and other devices that need to be recharged by plugging into the mains.
  • How about a water filter potabilice waste and generate electricity? Ideal for a spacecraft or orbital station. In general, ideal for any closed ecosystem.

Links to deepen the topic:

The New Scientist article where the invention of the robot is explained, and where they explain in detail how the energy of a sugar is transformed into a stream of electrons capable of producing the energy needed by the robot.
The New Scientist (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn6366)

website where they explain how the energy of sugar (or any polysaccharide) into electrical energy is transformed:
Geobacter (http://www.geobacter.org/)

Article about bulbs that run on sugar cubes:
Sugar batteries (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn2899)